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The City of the Dead in Ozan, Hempstead County, Arkansas


burial
A "typical Caddo burial" from 800 years ago north of Ozan, Hempstead Countyy (LOC).

Can you believe that little bitty Ozan in Hempstead County, Arkansas is one of the southwest's oldest settlements? And one of its oldest cemeteries? And that the artifacts recovered from this settlement now reside in New York City and in private collections all across the United States?


Along North Ozan creek stand six mounds, built and used by the Caddos at least 800 years years prior. In 1918, archeologists from the Museum of the American Indian uncovered rectangular foundations of structures on the mounds that still showed evidence of green paint on the stucco walls, with altars and hearths on the short sides of the building. Forty-three burials that included 198 "earthenware pots, bowls, and bottles" were excavated, as well as pipes, crystals, jewelry and arrowheads, indicating that the site was ceremonial in nature. The mounds were graveyards that formed the center of villages, with the rectangular buildings situated on the mounds used for ceremonial purposes. The Caddos burned the buildings, buried them, and then erected new ones on top of the older structures over and over again for a period of at least 400 years.


Ozan in Hempstead County, Arkansas is a true City of the Dead, a place that was connected to the Battle Mound village along the Red River in Lafayette County. More information will be coming shortly!


Hill
A mound at Ozan in Hempstead County, Arkansas (LOC).

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gennenb
Jan 10

I didn't think Indian burial grounds were to be bothered. The remains & artifacts should have been left alone! And they definitely do not belong in New York City or in anyone's private collection. They belong to the tribe. These are their ancestors & they were dug up and sold to the highest bidder. These people who did this wouldn't want their ancestors final resting place to be destroyed, not in the least I'm sure.

May the spirits be with you for all eternity!

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jennisioux316
Jan 08

Remains and artifacts need to be returned to the tribes. As a Native American myself, I feel this is disrespectful.

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Robin Cole-Jett
Robin Cole-Jett
Jan 09
Replying to

I agree. This was done in the 1920s and practices have changed. Archeological investigations of cemeteries occur to many different cultures, including German, Aztec, Egyptian, Welsh, etc.

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blssla1977
Jan 08

I love this so much we have such a rich ancestral history here in Arkansas, I was born and raised here and it's one of the most beautiful places in the world, This state really is a jewel of natural beauty, I am proud to be born and raised Arkansan Thank you so much for sharing this story and your love of history, I will be waiting impatiently for the next chapter! I'm really excited to hear the rest of your story and findings!

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Gennen Brizendine
Gennen Brizendine
Feb 02
Replying to

Yes it is interesting but to remove them, this is decimation of Graves they should be left alone not taken to New York City or bought for private collections! Why can't they leave things alone? And since times have changed they should be forced to return all items to the tribe free of charge. The tribe did not sell their ancestors. They say when burial grounds are decimated the spirits will stay with you. I hope that is true!

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claudia.norris90
Jan 07

This is so interesting to me. My Daddy was always so drawn to the Red River and always took us places along it. His ancestral Grandmother was said to be American Indian but we can’t find records of her family heritage.

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coburncliff
Jan 07

Fascinating!

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